In support of COP23

AS part of its initiative to support Fiji’s vision of combating the impacts of climate change and in support of Fiji’s
Presidency of the COP23, the iTaukei Land Trust Board (TLTB) is going out helping communities by issuing
conservation leases, planting trees as well as mangroves.

COP23 refers to the 23rd annual Conference of the Parties to the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention
on Climate Change and of which our Prime Minister Mr Voreqe Bainimarama is the President.

As a result TLTB has so far planted thousands of trees and mangroves in Ba, Nadroga, Ra, Macuata, Naitasiri,
Rewa and Tailevu.

General Manager Mr Tevita Kuruvakadua said that TLTB’s core function is linked very closely to the Government’s strategic effort to combat global warming and the human activity that causes it.

“We believe that every citizen in Fiji, individually or as a corporate entity, havea role to play. And for TLTB we are glad that as the biggest land management services in Fiji we are taking the lead to support the Government in mitigating the impacts of climate change,” he said.

Mr Kuruvakadua said this was the initiative of the staff under the Fiji Business Excellence Award Committee.

“We are glad that as the biggest land management services in Fiji we are taking the lead to support the Government in mitigating the impacts of climate change,”

“We have seen the need to give back to the community in the manner that we are doing by conserving our existing
forests and planting trees in strategic areas with the help of the Department of Forests and respective provincial
councils,” he added.

TLTB’s Goal 4 of the 2017 Strategic Plan stipulates the importance of partnership engagement and support for the
implementation of international and regional environment conventions.

One of TLTB’s recent corporate social responsibility (CSR) activity was the planting of 800 mangrove plants at
Qoma Village (Tailevu) which was one of the areas brutally ravaged by king tides and tsunami during Cyclone Winston early last year.

“Their seawall is basically made up of dead corals and stones. Over the years, due to the constant impact
of this weathering agent, sea walls around Qoma are damaged and there are extreme signs of coastal erosion.
Villagers attempt to rebuild their seawall with cement filled in drums but it could not help,” he said.

The villagers have raised their concerns at different forums including the Tailevu Provincial Council and TLTB came to help and planted mangroves along their shoreline to protect their island home and the ecosystems in general.


This story is being published in memory of the late Productivity Officer Mrs Reijeli Gade (right) who passed away in August at her home in Nadawa. She has been the hallmark of success for the last three years especially in terms of Business Excellence, Quality Circle, 5’S’ and our corporate social responsibility (CSR).